Khuvsgul nuur is located in the northwest of Mongolia near the Russian border, at the foot of the eastern Sayan Mountains. It is 1,645 metres (5,397 feet) above sea level, 136 kilometres (85 miles) long and 262 metres (860 feet) deep. It is the second-most voluminous freshwater lake in Asia, and holds almost 70% of Mongolia’s fresh water and 0.4% of all the fresh water in the world.[1] The town of Hatgal is at the southern end of the lake.

Its watershed is relatively small, and it only has small tributaries. It is drained at the south end by the Egiin Gol, which connects to the Selenge and ultimately into Lake Baikal. Between the two lakes, the water travels a distance of more than 1,000 km (621 mi), and falls 1,169 metres (3,835 feet), although the line-of-sight distance is only about 200 km (124 mi). Its location in northern Mongolia forms one part of the southern border of the great Siberian taiga forest, of which the dominant tree is the Siberian Larch (Larix sibirica),

The lake is surrounded by several mountain ranges. The highest mountain is the Bürenkhaan / Mönkh Saridag (3,492 metres (11,457 feet)), which has its peak north of the lake exactly on the Russian-Mongolian border. The surface of the lake freezes over completely in winter. The ice cover in winter is strong enough to carry heavy trucks; transport routes were installed on its surface as shortcuts to the normal roads. However, this practice is now forbidden to prevent pollution of the lake from both oil leaks and trucks breaking through the ice. It is estimated that 30-40 vehicles have sunk into the lake over the years.[citation needed]

Ecological significance

Khuvsgul is one of seventeen ancient lakes in the world, being more than 2 million years old, and the most pristine (apart from Lake Vostok),[2][3] as well as being the most significant drinking water reserve of Mongolia. Its water is potable without any treatment. Hovsgol is an ultraoligotrophic lake with low levels of nutrients, primary productivity and high water clarity (secchi depths > 18 m are common). Hovsgol’s fish community is species-poor compared to that of Lake Baikal. Species of commercial and recreational interest include Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis), burbot (Lota lota), lenok (Brachymystax lenok), and the endangered endemic Hovsgol grayling (Thymallus nigrescens). Though endangered by poaching during its spawning runs, the Hovsgol grayling is still abundant throughout much of the lake.[4]

The Lake area is a National Park bigger than Yellowstone and strictly protected as a transition zone between Central Asian Steppe and the Siberian Taiga. Despite Hovsgol’s protected status, illegal fishing is common and prohibitions against commercial fishing with gillnets are seldom enforced. The lake is traditionally considered sacred in a land suffering from arid conditions where most lakes are salty.

The Park is home to a variety of wildlife such as ibex, argali, elk, wolf, wolverine, musk deer, brown bear, Siberian moose, and sable.

The Hövsgöl (Khövsgöl) Long-term Ecological Research Site (LTERS) was established in 1997 and an extensive research program began soon thereafter. Now part of an international network of long-term study sites, the Hövsgöl LTERS provides a stage for nurturing Mongolia’s scientific and environmental infrastructures, studying climate change, and developing sustainable responses to some of environmental challenges facing the lake and its watershed.

DEPARTURE/RETURN LOCATION Chinggis Khaan International Airport
DEPARTURE TIME
INCLUDED
Airfare Accommodations
Local transportation Professional guide
NOT INCLUDED
Entrance fees
Guide gratuity

 

Price 

People Price
4 280$
3 380$
2 445$
1 845$
1

Day 1: Departure

  • pick-up Chinggis khaan airport
  • Place in the Hotel
  • Traveled in the Ulaanbaatar city.
  • As a socio-economic, political and cultural center of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar welcomes you with various destinations and attractions.
  • Either you are visiting Ulaanbaatar (its different spelling), for business or pleasure, you should definitely have sometime out exploring its history, arts, and natural museums that can give you ample understanding about not only the country itself, but its connections, roles and influences in the region and the whole world, in a broader sense.
  • We make sure to take you to the most popular museums and other highlighting spots in UB during this tour.
2

Day 2

From Ulaanbaatar to Elsen tasarkhai. drive Mongolian camel /Camp/
3

Day 3

Elsen tasarkhai to Khar khorin/Camp/
4

Day 4

From Kharkhorin to Terkhiin tsagaan nuur lake/Camp/
5

Day 5

From Terkhiin tsagaan nuur lake to Shine-Ider /Tent/
6

Day 6-7

From Shine-Ider to Khuvsgul lake/Camp/ 
7

Day 8

From Khuvsgul lake to Ulaanbaatar fly by aircraft
8

Day 9

Time out Ulaanbaatar city/Hotel/

Day 10:Return

Chinggis khaan airport

Kharkhorin (Mongolian: Хархорин) is a town and sum (district) center in Övörkhangai Province in Mongolia. The sum population was 13,828 (1994), 13,964 (2000), and 13,496 (2003). The population of Kharkhorin town itself was 8,977 in 2003 and covered an area of 20.5 km2.

Kharkhorin is located at the lower end of the upper valley of the Orkhon River which is included within UNESCO’s World Heritage Site Orkhon Valley Cultural Landscape. The location marks the easternmost foothills of the Khangai Mountains, where they meet the rolling steppe of central Mongolia.

Nearby are the ruins of the ancient town of Karakorum (also known as Kharkhorum or Qara Qorum) which, for a short time, served as the capital of the Mongol Empire under Ogedei Khan. Another Kharkhorin landmark is Erdene Zuu monastery and its famous phallic rock. The important Paleolithic archaeological site of Moiltyn-am is located near the bridge over the Orkhon River, just west of the settlement. A modern resort is south of Kharkhorin at Khujirt on the Orkhon River.

Kharkhorin’s principal sources of income are tourism and agriculture. Water from the Orkhon River serves to irrigate crops on the large plain east of the town. The Kharkhorin Airport (KHR/ZMHH) has one unpaved runway and is served by regular flights from and to Mongolia’s capital, Ulan Bator.

Terkhiin Tsagaan Nuur National park

This national park is the highlight of Arkhangai province and famous for its attractive scenery.

It is situated in 580 km northwest of Ulaanbaatar. It has been protected since 1965, fully in 1997, to safeguard spectacular mountain scenery and endangered flora and fauna. It’s surrounded by the Khangai Mountains, which reach as 3000 meters above the sea level. The most area of the National park is covered by poplar and peach forest, where grow wild berries, rare herbs and great variety of berries and flowers. There are lots of animals such as deer, wild goat and other animals, as well as various kinds of birds. Khorgo volcano crater is situated at an altitude of 2210 m, 200 m wide and 100 m deep. Near the crater there are dozens of small caverns with stalactites hanging from their ceiling and walls. Because of volcanic eruption, the nature has very unique formation. One of them was deep ground cave with ice inside, which is called “Yellow dog’s hell”. The ice is left even in the hottest summer of the some years. Some of 13 stone shelters reach 1.7 m high, are formed with the lava flow.

Another spot in this National Park is Lake Terkhiin Tsagaan which is 16 kilometers wide, 20 kilometers in length 20 meters in depth, and 61 square kilometers in this area. The Lake is extremely beautiful with fresh water and rich species of fish and birds.

Geography

Khuvsgul nuur is located in the northwest of Mongolia near the Russian border, at the foot of the eastern Sayan Mountains. It is 1,645 metres (5,397 feet) above sea level, 136 kilometres (85 miles) long and 262 metres (860 feet) deep. It is the second-most voluminous freshwater lake in Asia, and holds almost 70% of Mongolia’s fresh water and 0.4% of all the fresh water in the world.[1] The town of Hatgal is at the southern end of the lake.

Its watershed is relatively small, and it only has small tributaries. It is drained at the south end by the Egiin Gol, which connects to the Selenge and ultimately into Lake Baikal. Between the two lakes, the water travels a distance of more than 1,000 km (621 mi), and falls 1,169 metres (3,835 feet), although the line-of-sight distance is only about 200 km (124 mi). Its location in northern Mongolia forms one part of the southern border of the great Siberian taiga forest, of which the dominant tree is the Siberian Larch (Larix sibirica),

The lake is surrounded by several mountain ranges. The highest mountain is the Bürenkhaan / Mönkh Saridag (3,492 metres (11,457 feet)), which has its peak north of the lake exactly on the Russian-Mongolian border. The surface of the lake freezes over completely in winter. The ice cover in winter is strong enough to carry heavy trucks; transport routes were installed on its surface as shortcuts to the normal roads. However, this practice is now forbidden to prevent pollution of the lake from both oil leaks and trucks breaking through the ice. It is estimated that 30-40 vehicles have sunk into the lake over the years.[citation needed]

Ecological significance

Khuvsgul is one of seventeen ancient lakes in the world, being more than 2 million years old, and the most pristine (apart from Lake Vostok),[2][3] as well as being the most significant drinking water reserve of Mongolia. Its water is potable without any treatment. Hovsgol is an ultraoligotrophic lake with low levels of nutrients, primary productivity and high water clarity (secchi depths > 18 m are common). Hovsgol’s fish community is species-poor compared to that of Lake Baikal. Species of commercial and recreational interest include Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis), burbot (Lota lota), lenok (Brachymystax lenok), and the endangered endemic Hovsgol grayling (Thymallus nigrescens). Though endangered by poaching during its spawning runs, the Hovsgol grayling is still abundant throughout much of the lake.[4]

The Lake area is a National Park bigger than Yellowstone and strictly protected as a transition zone between Central Asian Steppe and the Siberian Taiga. Despite Hovsgol’s protected status, illegal fishing is common and prohibitions against commercial fishing with gillnets are seldom enforced. The lake is traditionally considered sacred in a land suffering from arid conditions where most lakes are salty.

The Park is home to a variety of wildlife such as ibex, argali, elk, wolf, wolverine, musk deer, brown bear, Siberian moose, and sable.

The Hövsgöl (Khövsgöl) Long-term Ecological Research Site (LTERS) was established in 1997 and an extensive research program began soon thereafter. Now part of an international network of long-term study sites, the Hövsgöl LTERS provides a stage for nurturing Mongolia’s scientific and environmental infrastructures, studying climate change, and developing sustainable responses to some of environmental challenges facing the lake and its watershed.

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